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NASA image acquired December 4, 2010  After a respite of less than a month, Klyuchevskaya Volcano resumed erupting in late November 2010. The Global Volcanism Program reported several ash plumes that rose up to 7.9 kilometers (26,000 feet) above sea level from November 25–29. According to the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) seismicity was “slightly above background levels” on November 26th and 27th, and they reported observations of strombolian activity on December 1st and 2nd.  A plume of ash, steam, and other volcanic gases streamed from Klyuchevskaya on December 4, 2010, visible in this natural-color image acquired by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. In the large image, a much smaller plume is visible above neighboring Bezymianny Volcano.  NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen &amp; Robert Simmon, using ALI data from the NASA EO-1 team. Caption by Robert Simmon.  Instrument:  EO-1 - ALI  Credit: <b><a href="http://www.earthobservatory.nasa.gov/" rel="nofollow"> NASA Earth Observatory</a></b>  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html" rel="nofollow">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a></b> enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.  <b>Follow us on <a href="http://twitter.com/NASA_GoddardPix" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a></b>  <b>Join us on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenbelt-MD/NASA-Goddard/395013845897?ref=tsd" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a></b>
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S84-27232 (& Feb 1984) ---  Astronaut Bruce McCandless II, 41-B mission specialist, uses his hands to control his movement above the Earth - and just few meters away from the Challenger - during the first-ever extravehicular activity (EVA) which didn?t use restrictive tethers and umbilical?s.  Fellow crewmembers aboard the Challenger used a 70mm camera to expose this frame through windows on the flight deck.  McCandless was joined by Robert L. Stewart, one of two other mission specialists for this flight, on two sessions of EVA.
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On March 7, 2013 the Terra satellite passed over eastern Russia, allowing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard to capture volcanic activity at Shiveluch and Plosky Tolbachik, on the Kamchatka Peninsula, in eastern Russia. This image was captured at 0050 UTC.   Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html" rel="nofollow">NASA image use policy.</a></b>  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html" rel="nofollow">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a></b> enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.  <b>Follow us on <a href="http://twitter.com/NASA_GoddardPix" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a></b>  <b>Like us on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenbelt-MD/NASA-Goddard/395013845897?ref=tsd" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a></b>  <b>Find us on <a href="http://instagram.com/nasagoddard?vm=grid" rel="nofollow">Instagram</a></b>
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Associate Administrator for Education and Astronaut Leland Melvin, left, and  President of LEGO Education USA Stephan Turnipseed, right, talk with a student during the “Build the Future” activity where students created their vision of the future in space with LEGO bricks and elements inside a tent that was set up on the launch viewing area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Monday, Nov. 1, 2010.  NASA and The LEGO Group signed a Space Act Agreement to spark children's interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)
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S84-27018 (7 Feb 1984) --- Astronaut Bruce McCandless II approaches his maximum distance from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Challenger in this 70mm frame photographed by his fellow crewmembers onboard the reusable vehicle.  McCandless is in the midst of the first "field" tryout of the nitrogen-propelled, hand-controlled back-pack device called the manned maneuvering unit (MMU).  Astronaut Robert L. Stewart got a chance to test the same unit a while later in the lengthy EVA session while the two spacewalkers were photographed and monitored by their fellow crewmembers in Challenger's cabin.  Those inside were Astronauts Vance D. Brand, Robert L. Gibson and Dr. Ronald E. McNair.
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S66-63011 (13 Nov. 1966) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini-12 spaceflight, took this picture of the Gemini-12 spacecraft during standup extravehicular activity (EVA) with the hatch open. Photo credit: NASA
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SL3-115-1833 (6 Aug. 1973) --- Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, participates in the Aug. 6, 1973, extravehicular activity (EVA) during which he and astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, deployed the twin pole solar shield to help shade the Orbital Workshop (OWS). Note the striking reflection of the Earth in Lousma?s helmet visor. This photograph was taken with a 70mm hand-held Hasselblad camera. Photo credit: NASA
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Smiling skiers toasting cup of coffees on snow covered mountain
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AS12-47-6897 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Apollo 12 commander, stands beside the United States flag after it was unfurled on the lunar surface during the first extravehicular activity (EVA), on Nov. 19, 1969. Several footprints made by the crewmembers can be seen in the photograph. While astronauts Conrad and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Intrepid" to explore the Ocean of Storms region of the moon, astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Yankee Clipper" in lunar orbit.
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AS14-64-9118 (6 Feb. 1971) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, photographed this overall view of a field of boulders on the flank of Cone Crater, during the second extravehicular activity (EVA), on Feb. 6, 1971. The view is looking south across the lunar valley through which the Apollo 14 moon-explorers flew their Lunar Module (LM) during the final approach to the landing. Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, joined Shepard in exploring the moon, while astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.
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STS049-91-026 (13 May 1992) --- Three astronauts hold onto the 4.5-ton Intelsat VI satellite after a six-handed "capture" was made minutes earlier. Left to right are astronauts Richard J. Hieb, Thomas D. Akers and Pierre J. Thuot. Thuot stands on the end of the remote manipulator system arm, from which he had made two earlier unsuccessful grapple attempts on two-person extravehicular activity sessions. Ground controllers and crew members agreed that a third attempt, using three mission specialists in the cargo bay of the space shuttle Endeavour, was the effort needed to accomplish the capture feat.
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S84-27023 (7 Feb 1984) --- This 70mm frame shows astronaut Bruce McCandless II moving in to conduct a test involving the Trunion Pin Attachment Device (TPAD) he carries and the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS-01A) partially visible at bottom of frame. SPAS was a stand-in for the damaged Solar Maximum Satellite (SMS) which will be visited for repairs by the STS-41C Shuttle crew in early spring.  This particular Extravehicular Activity (EVA) session was a rehearsal for the SMS visit. The test and the actual visit to the SMS both involve the use of jet-powered, hand-controlled Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU). The one McCandless uses is the second unit to be tested on this flight. Astronaut Robert L. Stewart got a chance to work with both MMU's on the two EVA's.
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Couple performing yoga together on the beach during sunset
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