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Free Cool Astronaut Wallpaper & Pictures

Who said you can't be an astronaut? Pikwizard has a lot of cool astronaut photos for you to download. We have many high-resolution, free photos available in our free stock photo library. Browse, download, or use these cool astronaut wallpaper as a background image for your computer desktop.

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AS17-162-24049 (7-19 Dec. 1972) --- A fellow crewman took this picture of astronaut Eugene A. Cernan dozing aboard the Apollo 17 spacecraft during the final lunar landing mission in NASA's Apollo program. Also, aboard Apollo 17 were astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. "Jack" Schmitt, lunar module pilot. Cernan was the mission commander.
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STS064-45-012 (16 Sept. 1994) --- Backdropped against a massive wall of white clouds 130 nautical miles below, astronaut Mark C. Lee floats freely as he tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system. The image was exposed with a 35mm camera from the shirt-sleeve environment of the space shuttle Discovery. Astronauts Lee and Carl J. Meade took turns using the SAFER hardware during their shared Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on Sept. 16, 1994. The test of SAFER is the first phase of a larger SAFER program whose objectives are to establish a common set of requirements for both space shuttle and space station program needs, develop a flight demonstration of SAFER, validate system performance and, finally, develop a production version of SAFER for the shuttle and station programs. Photo credit: NASA
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AS16-113-18339 (21 April 1972) --- Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, leaps from the lunar surface as he salutes the United States flag at the Descartes landing site during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA).  Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, took this picture. The Lunar Module (LM) "Orion" is on the left. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is parked beside the LM. The object behind Young (in the shade of the LM) is the Far Ultraviolet Camera/Spectrograph (FUC/S). Stone Mountain dominates the background in this lunar scene. While astronauts Young and Duke descended in the LM to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Casper" in lunar orbit.
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ISS023-E-052319 (26 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut T.J. Creamer, Expedition 23 flight engineer, works with an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station.
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STS109-E-5245 (4 March 2002) ---  Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld (foreground), payload commander, traverses along the longerons of the Space Shuttle Columbia  while astronaut Richard M. Linnehan, mission specialist, uses the Remote Manipulator System's robotic arm to move around. The two, participating in the first of their assigned STS-109 space walks to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), went on to replace the giant telescope’s starboard solar array. Their seven-hour space walk ended at 7:38 a.m. (CST) or 13:38 GMT March 4, 2002.
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ISS038-E-020263 (24 Dec. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, participates in the second of two spacewalks, spread over a four-day period, which were designed to allow the crew to change out a faulty water pump on the exterior of the Earth orbiting International Space Station. He was joined on both spacewalks by NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, whose image shows up in Hopkins' helmet visor.
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S114-E-5971 (1 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, mission specialist, floats in the cargo bay on  Discovery's aft end during the second scheduled spacewalk for STS-114.
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STS109-E-5449 (4 March 2002) --- Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld, payload commander, peers into the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Columbia during the first STS-109 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) on March 4, 2002.  Grunsfeld's helmet visor, with the sunshield now in place, displays mirrored images of the Earth's hemisphere and the Space Shuttle Columbia's aft cabin.  The distorted reflection gives the crew cabin a cyclops-like appearance. Astronauts Grunsfeld and Richard M. Linnehan replaced the starboard solar array on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on the first of five scheduled STS-109 space walks. The lower portion of the giant telescope can be seen behind the payload commander. The image was recorded with a digital still camera by a crewmate on shuttle's aft flight deck.
02
STS076-356-019 (22 - 31 March 1996) --- Astronaut Ronald M. Sega, payload commander, has removed a hatch and enters the Soyuz spacecraft, which is docked with Russia's Mir Space Station.  The point of view is from the Kvant Module.  The Space Shuttle Atlantis had docked, for the third time, with the Mir Space Station on March 23, 1996.
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AS12-48-7133 (20 Nov. 1969) --- This unusual photograph, taken during the second Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA), shows two U.S. spacecraft on the surface of the moon. The Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM) is in the background. The unmanned Surveyor 3 spacecraft is in the foreground. The Apollo 12 LM, with astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. and Alan L. Bean aboard, landed about 600 feet from Surveyor 3 in the Ocean of Storms. The television camera and several other pieces were taken from Surveyor 3 and brought back to Earth for scientific examination. Here, Conrad examines the Surveyor's TV camera prior to detaching it. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr. remained with the Apollo 12 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while Conrad and Bean descended in the LM to explore the moon. Surveyor 3 soft-landed on the moon on April 19, 1967.
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STS98-E-5229 (14 February 2001) ---  Astronaut Thomas D. Jones, mission specialist, participates in the final of three STS-98/5a space walks to perform work on the International Space Station (ISS).  The scene was photographed from the Space Shuttle Atlantis' crew cabin with a digital still camera.
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The STS-101 crew wave to onlookers as they leave the Operations and Checkout Building enroute a third time to Launch Pad 39A for launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis. The previous two launch attempts were scrubbed due to high cross winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility. They are (front) Pilot Scott J. Horowitz (left) and Commander James D. Halsell Jr.; (middle) Mission Specialists Mary Ellen Weber and Jeffrey N. Williams; (back) Mission Specialists Susan J. Helms, Yury Usachev of Russia and James S. Voss. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This is the third assembly flight to the Space Station. After the 10-day mission, Atlantis is expected to land at KSC May 6 at about 12:03 p.m. EDT
03
S65-30271 (3 June 1965) --- Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot on the Gemini-Titan IV (GT-4) spaceflight, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. His face is covered by a shaded visor to protect him from the unfiltered rays of the sun. White became the first American astronaut to walk in space. He remained outside the spacecraft for 21 minutes during the third revolution of the Gemini IV mission. He wears a specially designed spacesuit for the EVA. His right hand (out of frame) is holding the Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU), with which he controlled his movements while in space, and a camera is attached to the HHSMU. He was attached to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped together with gold tape to form one cord. He wears an emergency oxygen supply check pack. Astronaut James A. McDivitt is command pilot for the GT-4 mission. The mission was a four-day, 62-revolution flight, during which McDivitt and White performed a series of scientific and engineering experiments. (This image is black and white) Photo credit: NASA    EDITOR?S NOTE: Astronaut Edward H. White II died in the Apollo/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy, Florida, on Jan. 27, 1967.
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Astronaut James F. Reilly, STS-104 mission specialist, participates in space history as he joins fellow astronaut and mission specialist Michael L. Gernhardt (out of frame) in utilizing the new Quest Airlock for the first ever space walk to egress from the International Space Station (ISS). The major objective of the mission was to install and activate the airlock, which completed the second phase of construction on the ISS. The airlock accommodates both United States and Russian space suits and was designed and built at the Marshall Space Flight Center by the Boeing Company.
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S134-E-009077 (25 May 2011) --- With his Extravehicular Mobility Unit spacesuit backdropped against the blackness of space,  NASA astronaut  Andrew Feustel is pictured during the STS-134 mission?s third spacewalk (Feustel?s third for the mission and sixth overall in his career). Astronauts Feustel and Michael Fincke (out of frame), both mission specialists, coordinated their shared activity with NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff (out of frame), who stayed in communication with the pair and with Mission Control Center in Houston from the shirt sleeve environment inside the ISS. Photo credit: NASA
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ISS014-E-09531 (12 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 mission specialist, prepares to replace a faulty TV camera on the exterior of the International Space Station during the mission's first of three planned sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Christer Fuglesang (out of frame), mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA), also participated in the 6-hour, 36-minute spacewalk.
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ISS028-E-005283 (25 May 2011)  -- With various components of the International Space Station in the view, NASA astronaut  Andrew Feustel  is pictured during the STS-134 mission?s third  space walk ( and Feustel?s third, as well). Astronauts Feustel and Michael Fincke (out of frame), both mission specialists, coordinated their shared activity with NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff (out of frame), who stayed in communication with the pair and with Mission Control Center in Houston from the shirt sleeve environment inside the ISS.
02
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS -- (JSC 2000-03747) -- Official portrait of astronaut Richard M. Linnehan, Mission Specialist
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AS16-114-18439 (22 April 1972) --- Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, stands in the shadow of the Lunar Module (LM) behind the ultraviolet (UV) camera which is in operation. This photograph was taken by astronaut John W. Young, commander, during the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA). The UV camera's gold surface is designed to maintain the correct temperature. The astronauts set the prescribed angles of azimuth and elevation (here 14 degrees for photography of the large Magellanic Cloud) and pointed the camera. Over 180 photographs and spectra in far-ultraviolet light were obtained showing clouds of hydrogen and other gases and several thousand stars. The United States flag and Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) are in the left background. While astronauts Young and Duke descended in the Apollo 16 Lunar Module (LM) "Orion" to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Casper" in lunar orbit.
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ISS014-E-09508 (12 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first of three planned sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction resumes on the International Space Station.
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ISS014-E-09536 (12 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 mission specialist, prepares to replace a faulty TV camera on the exterior of the International Space Station during the mission's first of three planned sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Christer Fuglesang (out of frame), mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA), also participated in the 6-hour, 36-minute spacewalk.
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S71-16102 (January 1971) --- A Grumman Aerospace Corporation artist's concept of Apollo 14 crewmen, astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, as they set out on their first traverse. Shepard is pulling the Modularized Equipment Transporter (MET) which contains cameras, lunar sample bags, tools and other paraphernalia. Shepard has the Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector (LR3) in his other hand. Mitchell is carrying the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) barbell mode.
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ISS028-E-005266 (25 May 2011)  -- With various components of the International Space Station in the view, NASA astronaut  Andrew Feustel  is pictured during the STS-134 mission?s third  space walk (and Feustel?s third, as well). Astronauts  Feustel and Michael Fincke (out of frame), both mission specialists, coordinated their shared activity with NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff (out of frame), who stayed in communication with the pair and with Mission Control Center in Houston from the shirt sleeve environment inside the ISS.
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STS109-E-5450 (4 March 2002) --- Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld, payload commander, peers into the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Columbia during the first STS-109 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) on March 4, 2002.  Grunsfeld's helmet visor, with the sunshield now in place, displays mirrored images of the Earth's hemisphere and the Space Shuttle Columbia's aft cabin.  The distorted reflection gives the crew cabin a cyclops-like appearance. Astronauts Grunsfeld and Richard M. Linnehan replaced the starboard solar array on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on the first of five scheduled STS-109 space walks. The lower portion of the giant telescope can be seen behind the payload commander. The image was recorded with a digital still camera by a crewmate on shuttle's aft flight deck.
07
JSC2001-E-11702 (9 April 2001) ---  Astronaut James F. Reilly, STS-104 mission specialist, participates in an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) fit check in one of the chambers in the Crew Systems Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center (JSC).  The STS-104 mission to the International Space Station (ISS) represents the Space Shuttle Atlantis' first flight using a new engine and is targeted for a liftoff no earlier than June 14, 2001.
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S75-21674 (17 Feb. 1975) --- Astronaut Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot on the American ASTP prime crew, participates in Apollo-Soyuz Test Project joint crew training in Building 35 at the Johnson Space Center.  He is in the Docking Module mock-up.  The training simulated activities on the first day in Earth orbit.
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View of Rick Mastracchio,in his Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU),working to mate spare Pump Module (PM) Quick Disconnects (QDs) during International Space Station (ISS) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 25.  Image was released by astronaut on Twitter.
02
ISS018-E-042523 (23 March 2009) --- Astronaut Richard Arnold, STS-119 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 27-minute spacewalk, Arnold and Joseph Acaba (out of frame), mission specialist, helped robotic arm operators relocate the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart from the Port 1 to Starboard 1 truss segment, installed a new coupler on the CETA cart, lubricated snares on the "B" end of the space station's robotic arm and performed a few "get ahead" tasks.
00
ISS022-E-052227 (2 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut T.J. Creamer (left) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Soichi Noguchi, both Expedition 22 flight engineers, work with Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuits in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station.
04
Astronaut Standing Beside American Flag on the Moon
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AS17-134-20476 (13 Dec. 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 commander, approaches the parked Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) on the lunar surface during the flight's third period of extravehicular activity (EVA). South Massif can be seen in the background. The photograph was taken with a hand-held Hasselblad camera by scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. While the two explored the surface of the moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.
02
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston --  JSC2005-E-45340 -- Official portrait of Patrick G. Forrester, mission specialist on STS-117.
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S84-27017 (7 Feb. 1984) --- Astronaut Bruce McCandless II, one of two 41-B mission specialist, participating in a historical Extravehicular Activity (EVA), is a few meters away from the cabin of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger in this 70mm frame. This EVA represented the first use of a nitrogen-propelled, hand-controlled device called the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), which allows for much greater mobility than that afforded previous spacewalkers who had to use restrictive tethers. Robert L. Stewart, mission specialist, later tried out the MMU McCandless is using here. The two of them tested another similar unit two days later. Inside the spacecraft were astronauts Vance D. Brand, commander; Robert L. Gibson, pilot; and Ronald E. McNair, mission specialist. Photo credit: NASA
02
S118-E-07913 (18 Aug. 2007) --- Astronaut Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, participates in the final of four STS-118 spacewalks.
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S100-E-5264 (22 April 2001) --- A smiling astronaut Scott E. Parazynski, STS-100 mission specialist, peers into the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Endeavour during a lengthy spacewalk to perform important work on the International Space Station (ISS). The Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-2), which temporarily anchors the orbital outpost to the shuttle, can be seen behind the astronaut.  The picture was recorded with a digital still camera.
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ISS01-E-5356 (14 February 2001) ---   Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, STS-98 mission specialist, floats above the longerons of the cargo bay on the Space   Shuttle Atlantis during the final of three STS-98/5a space walks.  Partially  obscured behind Curbeam is astronaut Thomas D. Jones, his colleague and partner for all three walks.  The scene was recorded with a digital still camera.
04
This is an Apollo 17 onboard photo of an astronaut beside the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) on the lunar surface. Designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Boeing Company, the LRV was first used on the Apollo 15 mission and increased the range of astronauts' mobility and productivity on the lunar surface. This lightweight electric car had battery power sufficient for about 55 miles. It weighed 462 pounds (77 pounds on the Moon) and could carry two suited astronauts, their gear, cameras, and several hundred pounds of bagged samples. The LRV's mobility was quite high. It could climb and descend slopes of about 25 degrees.
04
STS105-E-5228 (16 August 2001) --- Closeup view of the helmet visor and upper torso of astronaut Patrick G. Forrester during early stages of the first space walk on STS-105. Most of the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery is reflected in the helmet. The image was recorded with a digital still camera.
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ISS028-E-005272 (25 May 2011)  -- With various components of the International Space Station in the view, NASA astronaut  Andrew Feustel  is pictured during the STS-134 mission?s third  space walk (and Feustel?s third, as well). Astronauts  Feustel and Michael Fincke (out of frame), both mission specialists, coordinated their shared activity with NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff (out of frame), who stayed in communication with the pair and with Mission Control Center in Houston from the shirt sleeve environment inside the ISS.
06
ISS013-E-81061 (13 Sept. 2006) --- Canadian Space Agency astronaut Steven G. MacLean, STS-115 mission specialist, performs a task to relocate articulating portable foot restraints (APFR) during the second of three scheduled spacewalks supported by the Atlantis astronauts and the crewmembers aboard the International Space Station.
06
STS105-725-024 (16 August 2001) --- Astronaut Patrick G. Forrester, STS-105 mission specialist, waves at a crew member inside Discovery's cabin during one of two sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Daniel T. Barry, mission specialist, joined Forrester on both space walks.
04
S114-E-6338 (3 August 2005) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, used the pictured digital camera to expose a photo of his helmet visor during today’;s extravehicular activities (EVA). Also visible in the reflection are thermal protection tiles on Space Shuttle Discovery’;s underside.
07
STS104-315-005 (12-24 July 2001) --- With Earth's horizon in the background, astronaut Michael L. Gernhardt, STS-104 mission specialist, participates in one of three space walks aimed toward wrapping up the completion of work on the second phase of the International Space Station (ISS).  Gernhardt was joined on the extravehicular activity (EVA) by astronaut James F. Reilly.
05
S114-E-5977 (1 August 2005) ---  Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi waves at a crewmate, during the August 1 extravehicular activity which he shared with astronaut Stephen K. Robinson.  Earth's horizon, approximately 225 statute miles below, is visible in frame's corner.
04
JSC2010-E-024581 (11 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronauts Mark Kelly (left), STS-134 commander; and Gregory H. Johnson, pilot, attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits, prepare for a training session in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center.
01
ISS023-E-044896 (17 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-132 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, 25-minute spacewalk, Bowen and NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman (out of frame), mission specialist, loosened bolts holding six replacement batteries, installed a second antenna for high-speed Ku-band transmissions and adding a spare parts platform to Dextre, a two-armed extension for the station?s robotic arm.
06
S65-30433 (3 June 1965) --- Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot of the Gemini IV four-day Earth-orbital mission, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. White wears a specially designed spacesuit; and the visor of the helmet is gold plated to protect him against the unfiltered rays of the sun. He wears an emergency oxygen pack, also. He is secured to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped in gold tape to form one cord. In his right hand is a Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU) with which he controls his movements in space.  Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot of the mission, remained inside the spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA    EDITOR'S NOTE: Astronaut White died in the Apollo/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy on Jan. 27, 1967.
02
S115-E-05663 (12 Sept. 2006) --- Astronauts Joseph R. Tanner (left) and Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper, both STS-115 mission specialists, work in tandem during the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while the Space Shuttle Atlantis was docked with the International Space Station. During today's spacewalk, Tanner and Stefanyshyn-Piper worked to connect power cables on the P3/P4 truss, release restraints for the Solar Array Blanket Boxes that hold the solar arrays and the Beta Gimbal Assemblies that serve as the structural link between the truss' integrated electronics and the Solar Array Wings. Stefanyshyn-Piper and Tanner also installed the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint and completed the connection of electrical cables between the new P3 truss and the P1 truss.
02
STS104-E-5200 (20 July 2001) --- Though it was a bit before Friday midnight in Houston, it was already into the morning hours of Saturday by Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) when astronauts James F. Reilly (left) and Michael L. Gernhardt were photographed with a digital still camera in the Crew Lock prior to depressurization of the compartment for the third and final space walk of STS-104.
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ISS028-E-005262 (25 May 2011) --- With various components of the International Space Station in the view, NASA astronaut  Andrew Feustel is pictured during the STS-134 mission?s third spacewalk (and Feustel?s third for the mission and sixth overall in his career). Astronauts Feustel and Michael Fincke (out of frame), both mission specialists, coordinated their shared activity with NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff (out of frame), who stayed in communication with the pair and with Mission Control Center in Houston from the shirt sleeve environment inside the ISS.
07
STS061-104-007 (5 Dec 1993) --- Astronaut F. Story Musgrave, holding to one of many strategically placed handrails on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is photographed during the first of five extravehicular activity?s (EVA) on the HST-servicing mission, aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour.
01
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. appears to be relaxed during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building (MSOB) prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A. Armstrong and Michael Collins, will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff, for the first manned lunar landing mission
01
ISS009-E-29449 (22 October 2004) --- The crewmembers onboard the International Space Station (ISS) gather in the Destiny laboratory for the ceremony of Changing-of-Command from Expedition 9 to Expedition 10. From the right are cosmonaut Gennady I. Padalka, Expedition 9 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency; astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke, Expedition 9 NASA ISS science officer and flight engineer; Russian Space Forces cosmonaut Yuri Shargin; cosmonaut Salizhan S. Sharipov, Expedition 10 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency; and astronaut Leroy Chiao, Expedition 10 commander and NASA ISS science officer.
04
STS054-33-030 (17 Jan. 1993) --- Astronaut Gregory J. Harbaugh (left) translates along the starboard longeron in space shuttle Endeavour's cargo bay while astronaut Mario Runco Jr. prepares to work on a restraint device near the aft cargo bay firewall. The two mission specialists spent four-plus hours on the extravehicular activity (EVA) on Jan. 17, 1993. Others onboard NASA's newest shuttle for the six-day mission were astronauts John H. Casper, mission commander; Donald R. McMonagle, pilot; and Susan J. Helms, mission specialist. The photograph was taken with a 35mm camera. Photo credit: NASA
00
ISS020-E-006394 (4 June 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 20 flight engineer, is pictured between two Russian Orlan spacesuits in the Pirs Docking Compartment of the International Space Station.
06
ISS013-E-49186 (8 July 2006) --- Anchored to the Space Shuttle Discovery's Remote Manipulator System/Orbiter Boom Sensor System (RMS/OBSS) foot restraint, astronaut Piers J. Sellers, STS-121 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first session of extravehicular activity (EVA) while the shuttle was docked with the International Space Station. Discovery's vertical stabilizer is at right. A blue and white Earth provides the backdrop for the scene.
01
Photographic documentation of the STS-109 Crew Return Ceremony.  The events take place at Hangar 990 at Ellington Field.    Views include:  Overall view of crewmembers [09319]; View of crewmembers standing on stage talking to group [09320]; Unidentified crewmember waving to crowd [09321]; Unidentified crewmember autographing photo [09322];   Mission Specialist Michael J. Massimino holding crew photo as he talks to child in group [09323]; Pilot Duane G. Carey signing a crew photo for a visitor [09324];   Unidentified crewmember signing a photo for visitor [09325]; Commander Scott D. Altman talking to child in group [09326]; Unidentified crewmember giving a photo to visitor [09327]; Crewmembers exiting plane [09328]; Duane G. Carey shaking hands with visitor.  Astronaut Scott Altman smiling in the background [09329); Astronaut Jim Newman kissing his child [09330]; Jim Newman holding his daughter as his son grabs at his pant leg [09331]; Close-up view of Payload Commander John Grunsfeld holding his daughter [09332]; Duane G. Carey standing with family members [09333]; Close-up view of Duane G. Carey placing his hand on a child's head as he is talking to him [09334]; Overall view of spectator watching ceremony [09335]; Close-up view of speaker during ceremony [09336]; Close-up view of Scott Altman speaking to crowd [09337]; Close-up view of a young spectator at ceremony [09338]; Close-up view of Duane G. Carey speaking to the crowd [09339]; Close-up view of Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie speaking to the crowd [09340]; Close-up view of John M. Grunsfield speaking to the crowd [09341]; Close-up view of Mission Specialist Richard M. Linnehan speaking to the crowd [09342]; Close-up view of James H. Newman speaking to the crowd [09343]; Close-up view of Michael J. Massimino speaking to the crowd [09344]
04
S70-34851 (11 April 1970) --- A space suit technician talks with astronaut Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot for NASA's Apollo 13 mission, during suiting up procedures at Kennedy Space Center (KSC).  Other members of the crew are astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., commander, and John L. Swigert Jr., command module pilot.  Swigert replaced astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II as a member of the crew when it was learned he had been exposed to measles.
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AS17-147-22527 (11 Dec. 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 mission commander, makes a short checkout of the Lunar Roving Vehicle during the early part of the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The Lunar Module is in the background. This photograph was taken by scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot.