Free Tropical Background Photos & Images

Fancy a trip to the warm tropics? We have compiled a diverse and colorful collection of imagery ranging from exotic animals, wide palm tree compositions to serene seas, that will all act as engaging backgrounds. If you would like to make a design you can use our free Design Wizard Tool by clicking the ‘Edit Image for free’ button, once you select an image.

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Two glasses of cocktail drink and tropical fruits kept on sand at tropical beach
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Landscape Sky Mountain
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Close-up of Lizard
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Coconut Palm Tropical
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Coconut Palm Tropical
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Coconut Palm Tropical
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Palm Tree Tropical
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Coconut Palm Tropical
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Palm trees tropical houses
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Beach sand tropical
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Palm Tree Tropical
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Coconut Palm Tropical
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Palm Tree Tropical
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Grass Summer Natural
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Animal chameleon colorful lizard
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Coconut, pineapple and two glasses of cocktail drink kept on the sand at tropical beach
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Coconut Trees in Sea Shore during Daytime
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Coconut, pineapples and two glasses of cocktail drink kept on the sand at tropical beach
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Palm Tree Tropical
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Tropical flower garland on white background
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Tropical fruits kept on sand at tropical beach
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Tropical flower garland arranged in heart shape on wooden board
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Pineapple fruit backpack tropical
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Palm Tree Tropical
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Tropical flower garland arranged in heart shape on wooden board
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Coconut Palm Tropical
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Hand preparing a tropical flower garland arranged in heart shape on wooden board
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Tropical Beetles Insect
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Pineapple fruit tropical fruit rocks
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Hand preparing a tropical flower garland arranged in heart shape on wooden board
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Empty beach chairs on tropical sand beach
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Two empty beach chairs on tropical sand beach
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NASA image acquired August 10, 2010  Tropical Storm Dianmu blew over the East China Sea in early August 2010, traveling slowly toward the Korean Peninsula. On August 10, 2010, the U.S. Navy’s Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) reported that Dianmu had winds of 55 knots (100 kilometers per hour) with gusts up to 70 knots (130 kilometers per hour). JTWC stated that the storm was roughly 270 nautical miles (500 kilometers) south-southwest of Seoul.    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this natural-color image on August 10. The storm, which sports a distinct eye, stretches primarily north-south, sending spiral clouds hundreds of kilometers southward over the East China Sea. Storm clouds skirt China’s eastern coast.    NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Michon Scott.   Instrument: Terra - MODIS  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html" rel="nofollow">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a></b>  is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe.  <b>Follow us on <a href="http://twitter.com/NASA_GoddardPix" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a></b>  <b>Join us on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenbelt-MD/NASA-Goddard/395013845897?ref=tsd" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a><b></b></b>
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Two glasses of cocktail drink and tropical fruits kept on sand at tropical beach
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Tropical Tree
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Two pineapples kept on the sand at tropical beach
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Blur view of coconut, pineapple and two glasses of cocktail drink kept on the sand at tropical beach
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Coconut, pineapples and two glasses of cocktail drink kept on the sand at tropical beach
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On Tuesday, June 11, 2013 Tropical Storm Yagi spun in the North Pacific Ocean just south of Japan. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this beautiful true-color image of the storm on that same date at 4:10 UTC (1:10 p.m. Japan local time).  The image shows a clear apostrophe-shaped cyclone, with a closed eye and somewhat elliptical shape. The clouds associated with the northern fringes of the storm draped over southeastern coastal Japan, and a long “tail” (or band) of thunderstorms fed into the center from the south. Multispectral imagery also showed tight bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center of the storm, although the building of thunderstorms was weakening around the center.  Near the same time as the image was captured, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center announced that vertical wind shear was starting to take a toll on Yagi. Northwesterly wind shear had caused the system to tilt slightly with the upper-level center displaced about 20 nautical miles east of the low-level center.  Tropical Storm Yagi developed from Tropical Depression 03W in the Western North Pacific Ocean on June 6, and intensified the weekend of June 8-9, when it reached Tropical Storm status and was given the name Yagi. Also known as Dante, the storm reached the maximum wind speeds on June 10 and 11, after which it began to weaken as it moved into cooler waters. On June 14, Yagi’s remnants passed about 200 miles south of Tokyo, and brought soaking rains to the coastline of Japan’s Honshu Island.  Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html" rel="nofollow">NASA image use policy.</a></b>  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html" rel="nofollow">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a></b> enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.  <b>Follow us on <a href="http://twitter.com/NASA_GoddardPix" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a></b>  <b>Like us on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenbelt-MD/NASA-Goddard/395013845897?ref=tsd" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a></b>  <b>Find us on <a href="http://instagram.com/nasagoddard?vm=grid" rel="nofollow">Instagram</a></b>
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NASA image acquired August 28, 2012  Early on August 28, 2012, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi-NPP satellite captured this nighttime view of Tropical Storm Isaac and the cities near the Gulf Coast of the United States. The image was acquired just after local midnight by the VIIRS “day-night band,” which detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses light intensification to enable the detection of dim signals. In this case, the clouds of Isaac were lit by moonlight.  Credit: <b><a href="http://www.earthobservatory.nasa.gov/" rel="nofollow"> NASA Earth Observatory</a></b>  NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using VIIRS Day Night Band data.   <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html" rel="nofollow">NASA image use policy.</a></b>  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html" rel="nofollow">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a></b> enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.  <b>Follow us on <a href="http://twitter.com/NASA_GoddardPix" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a></b>  <b>Like us on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenbelt-MD/NASA-Goddard/395013845897?ref=tsd" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a></b>  <b>Find us on <a href="http://instagrid.me/nasagoddard/?vm=grid" rel="nofollow">Instagram</a></b>
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Two pineapples kept on the sand at tropical beach
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Coconut and a sunglass kept on the sand at tropical beach
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Coconut and a sunglass kept on the sand at tropical beach
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Halved pineapple and a sunglass kept on the sand at tropical beach
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The outflow from Tropical Storm Toraji spawned tornadoes that caused injuries and property damage in Koshigaya, Saitama Prefecture, Japan, just northeast of Tokyo, on September 2, 2013. This image was taken by the Suomi NPP satellite's VIIRS instrument around 0425Z on September 2, 2013.  Credit: NASA/NOAA  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html" rel="nofollow">NASA image use policy.</a></b> <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html" rel="nofollow">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a></b> enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. <b>Follow us on <a href="http://twitter.com/NASA_GoddardPix" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a></b> <b>Like us on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenbelt-MD/NASA-Goddard/395013845897?ref=tsd" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a></b> <b>Find us on <a href="http://instagram.com/nasagoddard?vm=grid" rel="nofollow">Instagram</a></b>
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This image from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite shows tropical storm Andrea on June 6, 2013, at 2:45 p.m. EDT, as the system was making landfall in the big bend area of Florida.   Credit: NASA Goddard's MODIS Rapid Response Team  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html" rel="nofollow">NASA image use policy.</a></b>  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html" rel="nofollow">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a></b> enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.  <b>Follow us on <a href="http://twitter.com/NASA_GoddardPix" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a></b>  <b>Like us on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenbelt-MD/NASA-Goddard/395013845897?ref=tsd" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a></b>  <b>Find us on <a href="http://instagram.com/nasagoddard?vm=grid" rel="nofollow">Instagram</a></b>
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ISS024-E-012959 (30 Aug. 2010) --- Tropical Storm Danielle is featured in this Aug. 30 image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station.
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Tropical Cyclone Glenda took a five day tour of the Southern Indian Ocean in late February, 2015. The storm formed from a low pressure system, System 90S on February 24, when maximum sustained winds reached 40 mph (64 km/h).  The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of Tropical Storm Glenda on February 25 at 08:55 UTC (3:55 a.m. EST). At that time bands of thunderstorms wrapped into the low-level center of circulation. An eye was beginning to form.  At 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST) on February 25, Glenda's maximum sustained winds were near 63.2 mph (102 km/h). It was centered near 17.6 south latitude and 69.1 east longitude, about 760 miles (1,224 km) south-southwest of Diego Garcia. Glenda was moving to the west-southwest at 8 mph (13 km/h). At that time, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Glenda to strengthen to near 109 mph (176 km/h) before beginning to weaken. However, strong wind shear began to affect the storm. By the afternoon of February 26 Tropical Cyclone Glenda’s winds had dropped to about 58 mph (93 km/h), and by February 28 the storm had transitioned to an extra-tropical storm.  Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html" rel="nofollow">NASA image use policy.</a></b>  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html" rel="nofollow">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a></b> enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. <b>Follow us on <a href="http://twitter.com/NASAGoddardPix" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a></b> <b>Like us on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenbelt-MD/NASA-Goddard/395013845897?ref=tsd" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a></b> <b>Find us on <a href="http://instagram.com/nasagoddard?vm=grid" rel="nofollow">Instagram</a></b>
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Bucket, spade and sand castles on tropical sand beach
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At about 6:00 a.m. EDT (10:00 UTC) on May 10, 2015, Tropical Storm Ana made landfall between Myrtle Beach and North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. One day earlier, on the morning of May 9, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this true-color image of the storm off the coast of the Carolinas. At the time, Ana had just evolved from a subtropical storm to a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds of 93 kilometers (58 miles) per hour.  Ana’s life ashore was brief – the storm was downgraded to a tropical depression at 2:00 p.m. EDT (14:00 UTC) on May 10. During that time, parts of South Carolina and eastern North Carolina was drenched with heavy rain – some areas reported over 6 inches of rainfall – and heavy winds. A water spout was reported in Dare County, North Carolina, and the storm contributed to significant beach erosion along the coast.  Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html" rel="nofollow">NASA image use policy.</a></b>  <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html" rel="nofollow">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a></b> enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.  <b>Follow us on <a href="http://twitter.com/NASAGoddardPix" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a></b>  <b>Like us on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenbelt-MD/NASA-Goddard/395013845897?ref=tsd" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a></b>  <b>Find us on <a href="http://instagrid.me/nasagoddard/?vm=grid" rel="nofollow">Instagram</a></b>
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Three sand castles on tropical sand beach
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ISS024-E-012901 (30 Aug. 2010) --- Tropical Storm Danielle is featured in this Aug. 30 image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station.
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Overhead view of acoustic guitar standing in the sand at tropical beach
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Two glasses of cocktail drink kept on sand at tropical beach
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Acoustic guitar standing in the sand at tropical beach
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Champagne bottle and two glasses on sand at tropical beach
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Glass of cocktail drink kept on sand at tropical beach
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Glass of cocktail drink kept on sand at tropical beach
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Three sand castles and starfish on tropical sand beach
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Bucket with sand and a spade on tropical sand beach
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Two beer glasses kept on sand at tropical beach
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Champagne bottle and two glasses on sand at tropical beach
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Champagne bottle and two glasses on sand at tropical beach
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Bucket with sand and a spade on tropical sand beach
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Two beer glasses kept on sand at tropical beach
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Champagne bottle and two glasses on sand at tropical beach
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Bag with beach accessories on sand at tropical beach
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Champagne bottle and two glasses on sand at tropical beach
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Bucket, spade, starfish and sand castles on tropical sand beach
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Bucket with sand and a spade on tropical sand beach
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Bucket, spade and sand castles on tropical sand beach
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Bucket, spade and sand castles on tropical sand beach
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Santa hat kept on empty beach chair at tropical sand beach
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Two glasses, champagne bottle and picnic basket on beach blanket at tropical beach
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